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Last week Firefox rolled out their new update, Firefox 14, which features an automatic HTTPS encryption on all Google searches. This was expected for a while, but it’s no more welcome than the announcement first telling us it was coming.

What does this mean? All keywords used in search will show up as (not provided) on Google Analytics.

Whereas before it would only affect users logged into Firefox, it now affects all Google searches used in Firefox. Internet Explorer is also keen to pursue later in the year.

This update affects digital agencies, SEO enthusiasts and web developers everywhere, and is sure to be the question most are asked about over the coming months.

At Strategy, we have been preparing for it ever since it was announced. Once the effects really kick in, we will have the processes to back it up, ensuring your strategy is always on the right track.

Fix your links…oh actually, never mind

This was the message swarming over the internet this week, as webmasters were told that any warning emails they may have received in Webmaster Tools about bad links last week could in fact be ignored.

Ever since the Penguin update, confusion about exactly what constitutes a bad link and how much it affects a site’s ranking has been debated everywhere, from forums to blog sites.

Google’s stand point is that any bad links should be removed appears only to open the door to negative SEO from competitor sites.

This latest message is just another baffling twist in the evolving drama, Google’s Matt Cutts said that while in the past, messages were sent directly to webmasters who had incurred manual action from Google, now they are just general warnings to webmasters who could have unnatural links point their way.

But this doesn’t mean you definitely have. If you’re confident that you don’t, you can be safe in the knowledge that the message isn’t for you. However, there is no real way to discern this until you notice a drop in traffic and rankings which is by then, too late.

Tabbed sitelinks

Example of tabbed sitelinks

A recent flurry of posts mentioned the possible introduction of tabbed sitelinks by Google.

Most of the available pictures online, combined with new additions like the Knowledge Graph, show an intriguingly comprehensive picture for your enquiry.

There is no word yet on whether Google will start to allow webmaster input in the display of sitelinks.

Currently the whole process is automated and webmasters can only demote links as opposed to choosing what is displayed, but it is mentioned on their official site that it is something they are looking into.

Like the Knowledge Graph, it’s limited to the US at the moment, although we expect Google will roll it out to the wider world in the coming months.

Firefox's privacy update by